THEME

Hey, guys! Just a reminder that I’ve moved to a new blog, darrentreacy, and you can find the link in the description. This will probably be the last post, so feel free to follow, but if you don’t want to I totally understand. :) In a few weeks I’ll probably deactivate this account. 

Good morning, cuties! i just wanted to remind you that I am back on Tumblr (for good, I promise.) I want to thank all of you for putting up with my shit. I shed my “skin” quite a lot and to have you all accept this and keep me in your thoughts means the world. If you want to follow my new account, sweet! If not, I totally understand. :D Check out, darrentreacy

Hello, lovelies. I have decided to return to Tumblr. I’ve missed it and all of you so much. I’ve missed being able to express all of my inner most feelings and not being judged, but comforted and listened to. So, I am back and have decided to start fresh with a new account, darrentreacy. Feel free to refollow and unfollow this account, but please don’t feel like you have to. :)

Hello, everyone. I wanted to stop by and say hello to you all. I’m sorry I’ve been so distant. I’ve been going through a really rough time and needed to take a beak from Tumblr. Thank you for all the kind messages. They put a smile on my face. I’ll check in from time to time, answer messages; maybe even make a return to Tumblr again. I love you all.

fuckyeahrenaissancewomen:

Music was the interest closest to Lucrezia’s heart, and one she shared with her husband [Alfonso d’Este], who was himself an accomplished player of the viol. She employed her own singers, pipers, and lute players, even her own dancing master, spending a large part of her income on the patronage of music. She was particularly fond of songs, of the lovely Spanish poems that were set to music by her musicians; and she vied with her rival, Isabella d’Este, to attract the best players and composers to her court.
— Christopher Hibbert, The Borgias

fuckyeahrenaissancewomen:

Music was the interest closest to Lucrezia’s heart, and one she shared with her husband [Alfonso d’Este], who was himself an accomplished player of the viol. She employed her own singers, pipers, and lute players, even her own dancing master, spending a large part of her income on the patronage of music. She was particularly fond of songs, of the lovely Spanish poems that were set to music by her musicians; and she vied with her rival, Isabella d’Este, to attract the best players and composers to her court.

— Christopher Hibbert, The Borgias